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Brassica Breeding and Research Canola, Rapeseed, Mustard, and Biodiesel

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Brassica Research

Agricultural Sciences Bldg. Rm. 321
Phone: (208) 885-6710
Fax: (208) 885-7760
brassica@uidaho.edu

Mailing Address:
Brassica Breeding & Research
University of Idaho
Dept of Plant Sciences
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2333
Moscow, ID  83844-2333

Brassica Breeding and Research

For Growers

Canola Growers Manual
Field Trial Results

Part of our mission through our breeding efforts is to supply the local farming community and industry our vast wealth of knowledge and research. We do this by publishing papers, yearly Pacific Northwest variety trial data and variety releases. Every year we plant, collect crop establishment, growth, harvest data and compile this data on every variety planted. Seed data consists of plot weight, % oil content, fatty acid profile, 1000 seed weight, and with mustards, mucilage values. Before we and other seed developing companies certify seeds they have to be grown and tested in yearly field trials. Varieties grown consist of our developing Northwest specific varieties and hybrids, varieties supplied by seed companies, and controls; known certified varieties.


Field Trial Results

Pacific Northwest Variety Trials
Increases in field crop yield are the results of a combination of improved agronomic practices and advances in variety development. The UI Canola, Rapeseed & Mustard Program evaluates the relative performance of both spring and winter canola and spring mustard varieties at different locations throughout the Pacific Northwest. Varieties tested include commercial cultivars entered by cooperating seed companies, our advanced breeding lines, and some standard varieties. Our data is published yearly and available for review by any interested party. Please check back during the following the growing season for our latest updates. The full reports with oil content data are usually posted after the first of the year.

Variety Trials 2018:

 

Variety Trials 2017:

 

Variety Trials 2016: Variety Trials 2015:

Variety Trials 2014: Variety Trials 2013:
Variety Trials 2012: Variety Trials 2011:
Variety Trials 2010: Variety Trials 2009:
Variety Trials 2008: Variety Trials 2007:

Miscellaneous Reports

Variety Releases

Winter Canola Cultivars — Amanda, Athena, Ericka, Selkirk

Winter Rapeseed Cultivars — Durola*

Spring Canola Cultivars — Arriba, Cara*, Clearwater, Premier, Sunrise

Spring Rapeseed CultivarsGarnet, Gem, Sterling

Yellow mustard CultivarsIdaGold

Oriental mustard — Brown seed: Kodiak, Yellow seed: Pacific Gold

* pending release


Canola and Rapeseed — Winter Varieties

Athena and Ericka: (official press release)
'Ericka' PVP Certificate no. 9700371, Athena is pending. Ericka is a high-yielding, short, early maturing winter Brassica napus canola variety selected for adaptability to the Pacific Northwest region of the US. Ericka is highly suited for planting into summer fallow, has good adaptability for late planting, and potential for re-cropping in some regions. Ericka is a near pure-line cultivar that was developed by the Canola, Rapeseed & Mustard Breeding Group at the University of Idaho. Over 22 site-years of testing in the Pacific Northwest between 1992 and 1996, Ericka showed, on average, 26% higher yield compared to a control group if six common commercially available winter canola varieties. Oil quality was good, with greater than 60% oleic acid, less than 10% linolenic acid and less than 1% erucic acid. Seed meal is canola quality; averaging less than 12 micromoles of glucosinolate per gram of defatted seed meal. Ericka quickly produces a fall stand, and is frost tolerant and winter hardy. The Idaho Research Foundation is soliciting proposals for commercial development of Ericka under license (IRF Case 97-003).

Selkirk:
Selkirk' winter rapeseed [Brassica napus L. subsp. oleifera (Metzg.) Sinskaya f. biennis] (Reg. no. CV-13, PI 597351), PVP Certificate no. 9700370 was developed for use as an edible oil-quality (canola) cultivar by the Canola, Rapeseed & Mustard Breeding Group at the University of Idaho, and selected for adaptability to the Pacific Northwest.

'Selkirk' is a high-yielding, vigorous, mid-late maturing Brassica napus canola variety suitable for fall planting in summer-fallow fields. It is a near pure-line cultivar. Over a total of 22 site-years of testing spanning five seasons from 1992 to 1996 in the Pacific Northwest, the Selkirk yield per acre was 21% higher, on average, than six common commercially available winter canola varieties. Average oil content for Selkirk was slightly higher than Cascade, a widely planted variety, and oil quality was good, with greater than 60% oleic acid, less than 10% linolenic acid and less than 1% erucic acid. Seed meal quality is also good, with less than 50 micromoles of glucosinolates per gram. Selkirk shows good winter hardiness and frost tolerance. The Idaho Research Foundation is soliciting proposals for commercial development of Selkirk under license (IRF Case 97-003).

Canola and Rapeseed — Spring Varieties

Garnet:
'Garnet' a spring rapeseed [Brassica napus L. subsp. oleifera (Metzg.) Sinskaya f. annua], PVP Certification no.9700373. 'Garnet' was developed for use as an industrial oil-quality cultivar by the Canola, Rapeseed & Mustard Breeding Group at the University of Idaho, and selected for adaptability to the Pacific Northwest.

'Garnet' is a near pure-line spring rapeseed cultivar with erucic acid content in the seed oil and canola-quality seed meal. Over a total of 22 site-years of testing spanning 3 seasons from 1994-1996, when compared to other commercially available standards. Garnet has average to better seed oil content, but it out yields, and has higher erucic acid content, than the standards. Total seed glucosinolate level was low, averaging 7.2 micromoles de-fatted seed meal.

Sterling:
'Sterling' is a spring rapeseed [Brassica napus L. subsp. oleifera (Metzg.) Sinskaya f. annua], PVP Certificate no. 9700372. 'Sterling' was developed for use as an industrial oil-quality cultivar by the Canola, Rapeseed & Mustard Breeding Group at the University of Idaho, and selected for adaptability to the Pacific Northwest.

'Sterling' is a near pure-line spring rapeseed cultivar with high erucic acid content in seed oil and canola-quality meal. Over a total of 22 site-years of testing spanning 3 seasons from 1994-1996, 'Sterling' was higher yielding at all sites than all commercially available cultivars. Oil content compared well with the highest standard, but with significantly higher erucic acid content. Seed meal quality is also good, glucosinolate levels are lower than the standard of de-fatted meal, with only 10.7 micromoles. On average Sterling flowers and matures earlier than industry standards.

Sunrise:
'Sunrise' a spring rapeseed [Brassica napus L. subsp. oleifera (Metzg.) Sinskaya f. annua], PVP Certification no.9700369. 'Sunrise' was developed as an edible oil type canola cultivar by the Canola, Rapeseed & Mustard Breeding Group at the University of Idaho, and selected for adaptability to the Pacific Northwest.

'Sunrise' is a near pure-line spring canola that is short in stature with medium-early maturity. In field trials conducted throughout the Pacific Northwest between 1994 and 1996, Sunrise produced on average 2013 kg ha -1, about the same as the best amongst a control group of seven commercially available varieties commonly grown in the Pacific Northwest. Oil content was similar to the control group, and oil quality was good, with greater than 60% oleic acid, less than 10% linolenic acid, and less then 1% erucic acid. Seed meal glucosinolate content was low, averaging 6.2 micromoles per gram of defatted seed meal. Plants are taller, mature a little later, and mature at about the same time as the industry standards, 'Springfield' and 'Westar'. The Idaho Research Foundation is soliciting proposals for commercial development of Sunrise under license (IRF Case 97-003).

Yellow Mustards

Idagold: (official press release)
'Idagold' condiment yellow mustard PVP Certificate no. 9700374: is an open-pollinated Sinapis alba L. cultivar developed by the Canola, Rapeseed & Mustard Breeding Group at the University of Idaho. Idagold was selected for vigorous growth and high yield in the dryland regions of the Pacific Northwest and similar limited-rainfall environments. Over 23 site-years of field trials in the Pacific Northwest, Idagold consistently yielded about 12% higher than other yellow mustard varieties commonly grown in North America ('Gisilba' and 'Tilney'). Idagold produces large uniform sized seed and bright yellow seed color. The oil fatty acid profile and glucosinolate content of Idagold is similar to Gisilba and Tilney, with 244 micromoles of total glucosinolate per gram of de-fatted meal, with sinalbin glucosinolate accounting for 97% of this. The Idaho Research Foundation is soliciting proposals for commercial development of Idagold under license.

Oriental Mustards

Kodiak: brown-seeded oriental mustard
Pending PVP documentation and filing, please stayed tuned.

Pacific Gold: yellow-seeded oriental mustard (official press release)
'Pacific Gold', Brassica juncea L., was developed as a condiment Oriental style hot mustard, by the University of Idaho Canola & Mustard Breeding group, industry standard is Canadian developed 'Cutlass'. Pacific Gold has been grown for specific use for Pacific Northwest growers and conditions in Pacific Northwest Variety trials through 6 growing seasons 1996-2002. Both oil content and seed size was significantly higher than the standard Cutlass. Pacific Gold is also taller, plants emerge quickly and crop establishment is rapid. Glucosinolate seed meal content is significantly higher in Pacific Gold, 303 micromoles of de-fatted seed meal compared to 216 micromoles in Cutlass. Investigation of the use of Pacific Gold in trials related to pest and disease control has begun based on the glucosinolate profiles of this variety, 99% of the total glucosinolate content is 2-propenyl.